Monday, October 26, 2015

Four Jewish Museums to participate in Museums Night Buenos Aires 2015


October 31, from 8pm to 3pm

The annual Noche de los Museos celebrates the city's vibrant visual arts.
Around 200 museums and cultural spaces across the city open their doors to the public for free, from 8pm until 3am. As well as permanent collections and exhibitions, some venues will show films, or put on concerts and theatre productions.

Three Jewish Museums will participate:
The Jewish Museum of Buenos Aires Dr. Salvador Kibrik
Anna Frank House
The Jewish Museum of Belgrano
Holocaust Museum

Learn about the all the museums you can visit

Posted by KosherLat Valeria Duek Jewish travel in Argentina

Museums night Buenos Aires 2015



October 31st, 2015 from 8pm to 3pm

The annual Noche de los Museos celebrates Buenos Aires' vibrant visual arts.
Around 200 museums and cultural spaces across the city open their doors to the public for free, from 8pm until 3am. As well as permanent collections and exhibitions, some venues will show films, or put on concerts and theatre productions.

Main Circuits

1. Milla de los Museos: The largest concentration of museums is in what is known as the Milla de los Museos (the Museum Mile), a stretch of a mile or so up the Av. del Libertador from Retiro to Palermo. Amongst others, the area is home to:
Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes (Av. del Libertador 1473, Recoleta)
Museo Nacional de Arte Decorativo (Av. del Libertador 1902, Recoleta)
Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires (MALBA, Av. Figueroa Alcorta 3415, Palermo)
Museo Evita (Lafinur 2988, Palermo)
Centro Cultural Recoleta (Junín 1930, Recoleta)
2. Milla Cultural del Sur: The southern neighbourhoods from Puerto Madero down to La Boca have seen a bit of a boom in museums and arts centres over the last decade. The Milla Cultural del Sur (Cultural Mile South) includes:
Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires (MAMBA, Av. San Juan 350, San Telmo)
Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Buenos Aires (MACBA, Av. San Juan 328, San Telmo)
Usina del Arte (Agustín Caffarena 1, la Boca),
Museo del Humor (Av. de los Italianos 851, Puerto Madero).

How to get from one place to the next

90 bus lines will be available for the public to travel freely between one venue and another, until 3pm.
BA Solidaria

This year, volunteers from the city's volunteer programme BA Solidaria will be collecting non-perishable foodstuffs for the Fundación Banco de Alimentos (Food Bank Foundation). Anyone who donates will have their name put in a draw to win a bicycle. A list and map of the collection points can be found here.
More information: www.lanochedelosmuseos.gob.ar

Posted by KosherLat Valeria Duek Jewish travel in Argentina

Festival Internacional de Cine Judío en Argentina en Noviembre 2015

¡YA ESTAN EN VENTA LOS ABONOS DE DESCUENTO!

Cinemark ha determinado que cada entrada comprada individualmente costará $ 65.=
El abono es por diez entradas al precio de nueve. De modo que se abona $ 585.=
No son personalizadas, por lo tanto cualquier espectador las puede usar. Son válidas para todas las películas del Festival y tanto para Cinemark Palermo como para Caballito.

Se entrega el abono a domicilio sin cargo extra. Para solicitarlo hay que escribir a info@ficja.com.ar proporcionando la dirección de entrega, rango horario probable para la misma y proveer un número telefónico de contacto.

Películas del 13° Festival Internacional Judío en Argentina

Publicado por KosherLat Valeria Duek Jewish travel in Argentina

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

B'nai Jeshurun NYC is visiting Argentina in April 2016



Over 30 congregants of B'nai Jeshurun NYC will be visiting Buenos Aires in April 2016, lead by Rabbi Marcelo Bronstein.

They will have the opportunity to see Argentina in all its complexity through a uniquely Jewish lens. Among the highlights of this tour will be a visit to the Seminario Rabínico and Comunidad Bet-El, both founded by Rabbi Marshall Meyer. On this tour of vibrant Buenos Aires, you will also have the opportunity to visit an Estancia (ranch), taste Kosher Argentinian style BBQ called asado, and enjoy the gaucho skills show and folkloric dancing.  On an optional pre-trip to Patagonia, explore spectacular glaciers with a sailing excursion to National Glacier Park in El Calafate.

The Jewish community in Argentina dates back to 140 years ago. In 1882, La Congregacion Israelita de Buenos Aires held the first minyan. By the early 1900s, there were 100,000 Jewish immigrants in Argentina, mostly from Eastern Europe. Some established themselves in the pampas, the fertile lowlands of Argentina, becoming gauchos (cowboys) who established Jewish rural agricultural communities. The Jewish community in Argentina today is the largest in Latin America. Of a total population of 41.45 million people, about 240,000 are Jewish, the majority of which live in Buenos Aires. There are approximately 70 synagogues, 60 Jewish educational institutions, and 20 kosher restaurants in Buenos Aires.

This Jewish Heritage trip is organized by KosherLat Valeria Duek. We tailor-made each itinerary to meet the interests and needs of every group.

Learn about the itinerary of BJ NYC  in Argentina.

Argentina is the perfect destination for your next congregational trip. Contact us today!

Posted by KosherLat Valeria Duek Jewish travel in Argentina


Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Película Soldado/Ciudadano en el ciclo de Cine-Debate Por la Paz


Soldado/Ciudadano
Directora: Silvina Landsmann
14 de octubre de 2015 en Tzavta
Perón 3638, Buenos Aires
Bono contribución $30

Publicado por KosherLat Valeria Duek Jewish Heritage trips to Argentina


Thursday, October 8, 2015

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

In Argentina, Where Culture Is 'A Right,' A Free New Arts Center Opens

By Bob Modello for NPR.org

Everything at the brand new Cultural Center in downtown Buenos Aires is free — from art installations to symphony concerts. "Culture is an investment for this government, not an expense," says Culture Minister Teresa Parodi.
Everything at the brand new Cultural Center in downtown Buenos Aires is free — from art installations to symphony concerts. "Culture is an investment for this government, not an expense," says Culture Minister Teresa Parodi.
Centro Cultural Kirchner
A new tourist attraction in Argentina — The Centro Cultural Kirchner in downtown Buenos Aires — has been posting some impressive numbers since it opened in mid-May. As many as 10,000 patrons a day are trooping through an ornate, turn-of-the-last-century building that has been converted into what's said to be the fourth-largest cultural center in the world. Remarkably, everything in it is free, from video installations to comedy acts to symphony concerts.
The bluish metal "skin" of La Ballena Azul (the "Blue Whale"), still under construction. The concert hall is three stories high and actually "floats" — it is mounted on shock-absorbing stilts to protect it from vibrations from the subway nearby.i
The bluish metal "skin" of La Ballena Azul (the "Blue Whale"), still under construction. The concert hall is three stories high and actually "floats" — it is mounted on shock-absorbing stilts to protect it from vibrations from the subway nearby.
Rodrigo Ruiz Ciancia/Centro Cultural Kirchner
They call the main concert hall La Ballena Azul, "The Blue Whale," and it swims inside a grand Beaux Arts palace where, for most of the last century, folks in Buenos Aires mailed letters: the former Central Post Office. The Blue Whale auditorium — blimp-shaped, three stories high, holding 1,750 people — floats in what used to be the package-sorting area.
Why "floats"? Because the subway runs nearby, says guide Federico Baggio. "So the vibrations would not enter the symphony hall. It ended up having a whale shape, so that's why they named it like that, but the purpose is acoustics."
A chandelier-like structure made of frosted glass sits above the Blue Whale. It is large enough to house exhibits.i
A chandelier-like structure made of frosted glass sits above the Blue Whale. It is large enough to house exhibits.
Centro Cultural Kirchner
The Blue Whale is the most eye-catching attraction in the new Kirchner Cultural Center, but even it can't upstage its surroundings. The Palacio de Correos, literally the "Postal Palace" — commissioned in 1889 and completed almost 30 years later — was the largest public building in Argentina when it opened in 1928. It's eight stories tall, occupies a full city block behind a French Second Empire facade, and contains almost 1 million square feet of marble hallways, stained-glass ceilings and windows. You can also find traces of original post office fixtures, such as mailboxes and grand marble counters where you could finish and address your letters.
When the new architects changed things, to add, say, elevators, or a boxy, chandelier-like structure above the Blue Whale that's big enough to mount exhibits in, they purposely used different materials: frosted glass, stainless steel. That way you never lose sight of the the ornate beauty of the original building — beauty that enticed President Juan Peron to move his presidential offices here in the 1940s from the nearby Casa Rosada.
First lady Eva Peron's desk now sits in a spectacular vaulted room. Once the office of the postal service director, it was later the headquarters for the Eva Peron Foundation.i
First lady Eva Peron's desk now sits in a spectacular vaulted room. Once the office of the postal service director, it was later the headquarters for the Eva Peron Foundation.
Centro Cultural Kirchner
And the grandest room — a spectacular vaulted space the size of a banquet hall that had been the office of the postal service director — became the headquarters for the Eva Peron Foundation, which dispensed charity and gifts to impoverished Argentine citizens. That space has been restored as a sort of museum exhibit, with everything from Eva Peron's desk to bottles of champagne, letters piled all the way to the 20-foot ceiling in one corner, dozens of toys, go-carts, and other gifts of the sort she dispensed.
Approaching the desk, you hear recordings of actors' voices re-creating what went on there — children excited over Christmas toys, or asking first lady "Evita" for something for their grandparents. It's a scene some older visitors can remember from real life, and occasionally prompts tears.

See Inside The Kirchner Center

  • Ornate ironwork graces grand staircases in Buenos Aires' Old Post Office, now the Centro Cultural Kirchner.
    Centro Cultural Kirchner
  • The front hall still has the original postal furniture and desks from its opening in 1928.
    Centro Cultural Kirchner
  • Walls and vaulted ceilings through the public, or "noble," parts of the building have been painstakingly restored.
    Centro Cultural Kirchner
  • The hundreds of original bronze postal boxes are still there.
    Centro Cultural Kirchner
  • The multistory central hall has a stained-glass ceiling, echoed in smaller stained-glass windows throughout the building.
    Centro Cultural Kirchner
  • Ornate woodwork, granite moldings and antique chandeliers gleam like new.
    Centro Cultural Kirchner
  • The Blue Whale auditorium (pictured still under construction) seats 1,750 in three tiers, with a stage suitable for symphony concerts backed by a pipe organ.
    Centro Cultural Kirchner
  • The original mansard roof of the dome atop the front facade has been replaced with glass to take advantage of spectacular views of the city and the Rio de la Plata.
    Centro Cultural Kirchner
  • The glass dome is now lit from within and will soon house a restaurant for patrons of the center.
    Centro Cultural Kirchner
These historic details resonated with the late President Nestor Kirchner, for whom the cultural center is now named, and for his widow, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, who succeeded him as president. They're from the Peronist party, and like Juan and Eva Peron, who founded that party, as well as such cultural institutions as the Argentine National Symphony, the arts are baked into their worldview, says Culture Minister Teresa Parodi.
"Culture is an investment for this government, not an expense," she says.
When The Palacio de Correos ("The "Postal Palace") opened in 1928 it was the largest public building in Argentina.i
When The Palacio de Correos ("The "Postal Palace") opened in 1928 it was the largest public building in Argentina.
Centro Cultural Kirchner
So when Kirchner saw this abandoned building, the thought was "not to turn it into a shopping mall, or" — as happened to Washington, D.C.'s Old Post Office — "a grand hotel. Instead, they pictured a cultural space — an enormous workshop where people can be developers of their own culture."
Parodi is herself a well-known singer/songwriter in Latin America, and when she accepted the Cabinet-level position of minister of culture, launching the new Kirchner Center became her responsibility.
At its debut on May 21, it was a work in progress, and even months later, there is work going on. Performance halls are complete, and six floors of art galleries are getting there, many devoted to what you might call art that's "gone postal": stamps in collages, a town's response when every citizen received a letter with a different story, performance art video installations about mail that aggravates and inflames.
The public sector in Argentina, says Parodi, operates on the assumption that the arts belong to everyone.
"We consider culture to be a right," she says.
The Argentine National Symphony — which has never had a permanent home — has taken up residence at the Kirchner.i
The Argentine National Symphony — which has never had a permanent home — has taken up residence at the Kirchner.
Centro Cultural Kirchner
That's why the Culture Ministry stages concerts and workshops for the homeless in shantytowns, and why, at the Kirchner Center, everything is currently free. There will eventually be a "symbolic payment," she says, noting that the building needs to be kept up, and artists paid for their work. But she says corporations will be invited to sponsor events and keep prices low and seats and galleries full, as they are now.
During his tour, Baggio notes that whenever the audience fills the building, Thursday to Sunday, it regains the feeling of all those people rushing to deliver mail, moving everywhere with this rhythm of rush hour.
That rhythm is clearly benefiting the artists who play here. Especially the Argentine National Symphony. The Perons may have founded it in 1948, but they didn't provide it with a home, and it has wandered, homeless for 67 years, from opera house to concert hall to auditorium.
Now, to the evident delight of the public, it has taken up permanent residency at the Kirchner Center. In July, the symphony hosted Argentina's own Martha Argerich, one of the world's great classical pianists. Parodi says 1.2 million people tried to access the ticket website (they collapsed it) for an auditorium that holds fewer than 2,000. "She was bigger than the Rolling Stones," Parodi marvels, "which speaks well for a country that is very cultured."
The "Blue Whale" auditorium can hold 1,750 people.
The "Blue Whale" auditorium can hold 1,750 people.
Centro Cultural Kirchner
In keeping with the building's origins, that symphony concert also included music from the movie The Postman, conducted by its Argentine composer Luis Enriquez Bacalov, as well as tango selections. And in keeping with the idea that culture should belong to everyone — and that 1.2 million people had wanted to hear Argerich — it was simulcast nationally on radio and TV.
Parodi seems so personally devoted to the ideas espoused by the Culture Ministry that I asked her whether she'd ever written a song that reflects the work she's doing there. She explained that that's not how songwriting works. But I said: Look, I'm doing a radio piece — I need a song to go out on.
She laughed, and pointed me to a song titled "La Canción es Urgente" ("The Song Is Urgent"), which she wrote about the role of popular song in the story of a people. She says it's about her dreams for her people, which makes it a love song. And she cites a lyric about the power of a song:
That your voice lifts it
That it releases it in the wind
And that it sounds of victory
When it breaks down the silence.
Parodi says while in her career as a singer it has been moving to be onstage, in the case of the Kirchner Center, she's also moved to be part of the audience, and part of the process of creating a cultural center — "doing all the things necessary so all of this can keep going."

Posted by KosherLat Valeria Duek Jewish travel in Argentina

Thursday, October 1, 2015

1er Seminario de Lengua y Cultura Idish de Buenos Aires

FUNDACIÓN IWO Y EL CENTRO INTERNACIONAL PARA LA LENGUA Y LA CULTURA IDISH DEL CONGRESO JUDÍO MUNDIAL, con el auspicio de AMIA organizan:

Primer seminario de Lengua y Cultura Idish de Buenos Aires
Del 7 al 11 de octubre de 2015

Programa de actividades
-Miércoles 7 de octubre- Sede de la Fundación IWO
Apertura del Seminario en la a cargo del Prof. Abraham Lichtembaum.
18 a 19,30 hs. Prof. Wolf Moskovich “¿Qué es una palabra ídish?”
20 a 21,30 hs. Dr. Mordejai Yushkovsky “Fradl Shtok, La Pionera”

-Jueves 8 de octubre - Sede de la Fundación IWO
10 a 11,30 hs. Prof. Wolf Moskovich “Idish durante la Shoah”
12 a 13,30 hs. Dr. Mordejai Yushkovsky “Los Marranos del siglo XX”
19,30hrs GRAN CONCIERTO “Una Judía, una esposa, una mujer”
Marina Yakubovich
Introducción a cargo del Dr. Mordejai Yushkovsky, con traducción
del Prof. Abraham Lichtenbaum

-Sábado 10 de octubre a las 19,30 – Sede de la Fundación IWO
Concierto – Nuevas canciones

-Domingo 11 de octubre - Sede de la Fundación IWO
10 a 11 Dr. Wolf Moskovich Linguistica
11,10 a 12,10 hs. Dr. Mordejai Yushkovsky “La inmigración judía y la literatura”
12,15 a 13,15 hs. Marina Yakubovich “Manguer, el poeta que pasó del gris al azul”. Introducción y explicaciones a cargo del Dr. Mordejai Yushkovsky, con traducción del Prof. Abraham Lichtenbaum.
13,30hrs Cierre del Seminario
Todas las conferencias serán en idioma idish con traducción al castellano
Disertantes
Dr. Mordejai Yushkovsky, Coordinador de programas del Centro Internacional
Nacido en Ucrania. Obtuvo su Maestría en Economía en Moscú. Desde 1989 en Israel. Doctorado en la Universidad de Bar-ilan en Literatura Idish. 2001-2004 fue Inspector de Estudios Idish del Ministerio de Educación de Israel. Dirige el Dpto. de Estudios del Idish del Seminario Lewinsky para Docentes.
Prof. Wolf Moskovich, Profesor Emérito de la Universidad Hebrea de Jerusalem del Dpto. de Lenguas Eslavas desde 1976 al 2004.
Graduado en Moscú en 1965. Prof. en Moscú y Leningrado donde dirigió el Dpto. de Computación Lingüística y Estudios Cognitivos. Miembro de la Academia de Ciencias de Ucrania y Medalla de Oro del Premio Zhabotynsky del Instituto de Intercambio Israel-Ucrania por sus Contribuciones Académicas.
Cantante: Marina Yakubovich. Cantante. Nació en Ucrania. Obtuvo su Maestría en Educación Musical en Rovno, donde enseñó en su Conservatorio Musical entre 1998-2001. Obtuvo el Primer Premio en el Concurso “Sh. Mijoels” en Moscú. Desde 2001 en Israel donde actúa permanentemente.

Informes e inscripción: Fundación IWO – Ayacucho 483, Buenos Aires – 4953-0293/9614
info@iwo.org.ar  www.iwo.org.ar

Publicado por KosherLat Valeria Duek Jewish travel in Argentina